BakeRecipes

Lemon buttermilk pound cake with lemon curd

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Prep 50min (+30min cooling time)
Bake 50min
Makes 8-10 serves

A heavenly layering of mouth-puckering lemon pound cake, curd and syrup, teamed with summer fruits and ‘soured’ cream, this dessert is one for lemon-lovers. The cake is just as delicious served either plain, toasted or chargrilled – just take your pick!

Ingredients

  • melted butter, to grease
  • 125ml (½ cup) sour cream
  • 125ml (½ cup) thickened cream
  • 2 x 125g punnets blueberries, to serve
  • 2 ripe medium mangoes, sliced, to serve

Lemon buttermilk pound cake

  • 125g butter, at room temperature
  • 220g (1 cup) caster sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tablespoon finely grated lemon zest
  • 225g (1½ cups) plain flour
  • ½ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • 125ml (½ cup) buttermilk
  • 1 tablespoon strained fresh lemon juice

Lemon curd

  • 125ml (½ cup) strained fresh lemon juice
  • 165g (¾ cup) caster sugar
  • 3 eggs, whisked and strained
  • 100g unsalted butter, cubed, at room temperature

Lemon syrup

  • 110g (½ cup) caster sugar
  • 160ml (⅔ cup) strained fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons water

Method

  1. To make the lemon buttermilk pound cake, preheat oven to 180°C (160°C fan-forced). Grease a 9cm x 19cm (base measurement) loaf tin and line the base and long sides with one piece of non-stick baking paper. Use an electric mixer to beat the butter and sugar until pale and creamy. Add the eggs one at a time, beating well after each. Beat in the lemon zest. Sift together the flour and bicarbonate of flour. Combine the buttermilk and lemon juice. On lowest possible speed beat in half the flour mixture and then half the buttermilk mixture until just combined. Repeat with the remaining flour and buttermilk mixtures in two more batches until just combined. Pour the mixture into the prepared tin and smooth the surface with the back of a spoon. Bake in preheated oven for 50 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean. Leave to stand in the tin for 5 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool (this will take about 30 minutes).
  2. To make the lemon curd, combine the lemon juice, sugar and eggs in a medium heatproof bowl and place over a saucepan of simmering water (make sure the bowl doesn’t touch the water). Stir with a wooden spoon for 10-12 minutes or until the mixture thickens to a consistency similar to pouring cream (do not boil). Remove the bowl from the saucepan and gradually stir in the butter until the butter is evenly incorporated and the curd is smooth. Cover with plastic wrap (see Baker’s tips) and place in the fridge to chill.
  3. To make the lemon syrup, combine the sugar, water and lemon juice in a small saucepan and stir over medium heat until the sugar dissolves. Bring to the boil and boil for 3 minutes or until reduced slightly.
  4. To serve, combine the cream and sour cream in a medium bowl and use a balloon whisk to whisk until soft peaks form. Transfer to a serving bowl. Preheat a chargrill pan on high (see Baker’s tips). Cut the cake into 1.5 cm-thick slices and toast in a toaster until lightly golden and warmed through. Transfer to a plate and place in the centre of the table with the curd, syrup, fruit and cream for guests to assemble their own dessert.

Baker's Tips

  • The Lemon buttermilk pound cake will keep in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 2 days.
  • If making the curd ahead of time, you can transfer it straight into a clean airtight jar, cover with an airtight lid and place in the fridge. It will keep in an airtight jar or container in the fridge for up to 1 week.
  • The lemon syrup will keep in an airtight jar or container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.
  • The cake can be also toasted in a sandwich press or in a toaster until golden.
  • The combined whipped cream and sour cream can be replaced by scoops of good-quality vanilla ice-cream if desired.
This recipe is from Anneka's SBS Food online column, Bakeproof: Desserts To ShareCLICK HERE for more Bakeproof recipes.


Photography by Alan Benson.